English

The English department is committed to providing a varied curriculum which is designed not only to provide students with the language skills that they will need throughout their academic lives and beyond, but also to foster a genuine engagement with and enjoyment of different types of literature. To ensure that students know how to progress to the next level, the English department use a range of strategies including individual targets for improvement and teacher, peer and self-assessment.

  • YEAR 7

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    In Year 7, the aim of our curriculum is to secure, assess and improve the English skills needed to access and achieve against the new GCSE specification. Our students will experience a varied range of reading, writing, speaking and listening tasks and activities.

    COURSE OUTLINE

    Term 1 - Transition – Baseline testing and reviewing literacy skills
    In this unit, students will be tested on their spelling and literacy skills alongside completing a standardised online reading assessment. Through these assessments we make a judgement about what kind of setting is best suited for the year group.

    Term 2 - Medieval
    Within this scheme of learning, students will improve their reading and writing skills through studying the classic narrative poem ‘Sir Gawain and the Green Knight’ whilst also learning about life in medieval England.

    Term 3 - Macbeth
    This Shakespearean tragedy forms the central focus for term 3. An extract approach to teaching the play will be taken which mirrors the GCSE exam paper. Building confidence with the challenging language is the central aim of this unit, working towards constructing formal reading responses and writing ‘in character’ among other tasks.

    Term 4 - Drama
    Classes will study different texts depending upon teacher preference. Speaking and listening skills are built in this unit and we aim to help students to build their confidence within class performances and presentations. This is a more practical unit and we encourage full participation from all students.

    Term 5 - The Plague (Non-Fiction Reading & Writing skills)
    This non-fiction unit places the students in the position of reporters, scientists and politicians (amongst others) as they learn about the outbreak of the Plague and its impact upon medieval society. Reading, writing and speaking and listening are all assessed through this unit.

    Term 6 - Sherlock Holmes study
    Classes will study different texts depending upon teacher preference. The shift to a studying more challenging texts is evident within this unit. The popularity of these detective stories (thanks to Benedict Cumberbatch and Robert Downey Jnr.) has created an interest in younger readers and we are thrilled to introduce our Year 7 students to one of the original stories.

    EXTRA-CURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES

    Debate club is an excellent opportunity for students across year groups to learn how to structure arguments formally and effectively. The focus here is building confidence alongside improving speaking and listening skills in a fun and friendly environment.
    There are a variety of clubs which run in the LRC which tie into our subject. Most notably, the Quillich club meets on a Tuesday lunchtime in which students set and take part in literary quizzes and creative writing activities.

    USEFUL WEBSITES

    https://www.nate.org.uk/cmsfiles/ict/English_home_list.pdf

    IMPORTANT INFORMATION

    Key Stage 3 lays the ground work for a successful GCSE course. The skills we focus on are central to achieving in this key subject and we are determined for students to begin Key Stage 4 on the correct learning pathway to achieve their targeted grade at GCSE level.

    PROVISION FOR MOST ABLE

    There are extension opportunities planned into each scheme of learning to ensure students are appropriately challenged within the Key Stage 3 curriculum.

    ASSESSMENT

    Students are assessed in a formative manner at least once a term and given the opportunity to make improvements to their work in ‘DIRT’ (Designated Improvement and Reflection Time) sessions in lessons. Students are also assessed in a summative manner once a term.

    The move away from levels has meant that we are able to tailor the Key Stage 3 assessment opportunities against the skills required to access and succeed within the GCSE framework.

    Skills are matched against the different schemes of learning and students know which areas they are being assessed against termly. Students chart their progress in the tracker sheets stuck into each exercise book.
    Termly small group intervention with an English teacher is put in place for students who are behind target in key skill areas to put them back on track.

  • YEAR 8

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    In Year 8, the aim of our curriculum is to secure, assess and improve the English skills needed to access and achieve against the new GCSE specification. Our students will experience a varied range of reading, writing, speaking and listening tasks and activities.

    COURSE CONTENT

    Year 8: Prejudice and Conflict (texts could be subject to change, however, the intended learning outcomes will remain the same)

    Term 1 Frederick Douglass: A Slave Narrative and Maya Angelou Poetry
    This unit, taught in parallel, teaches students about a hugely influential era in history which is often overlooked within literature study. Students will read a first-hand account of living and working on a plantation in 1700s America. We study the structure of the writing and develop writing skills through an exploration of multiple characters and ideas.

    The Poetry of Maya Angelou (amongst others) offers students insight into different experiences and cultures whilst analysing the language, structure and form of a variety of poems. Reading skills will be assessed throughout this section of the unit.

    Term 2 Non-Fiction Reading and Writing
    Students will experience a variety of non-fiction texts and analyse or replicate the conventions they find. There is plenty of opportunity for creativity and experimentation with language in this scheme of learning. We have built into this unit a solid foundation in understanding different form conventions which will enable students to access elements of the GCSE course with confidence.

    Term 3 and Term 4 Othello and Novel study
    These two units are taught concurrently with separate teachers. An extract approach to teaching this classic tragedy will be taken which mirrors the GCSE exam paper. Building confidence with the challenging language is the central aim of this unit, constructing formal reading responses and writing ‘in character’ amongst other tasks. Classes will study different novels depending upon teacher preference. The unit is designed for a full exploration of the novel with a strong focus on character, plot, structure and style.

    Terms 5 and 6 Oroonoko (19th Century Novel) and Journey’s End (Modern Drama)
    The shift to studying a more challenging texts is evident within this unit. Oroonoko (by Aphra Behn, 1688) is a short piece by one of the first published female authors of the Restoration era. It covers a multitude of themes: slavery, forbidden love and honour amongst others. Students will be challenged to develop their reading skills through translating the complex language. Journey’s End is set in a WW1 trench and follows three days in the lives of a small group of British officers. Students will be given the opportunity to consider staging and performance of the text whilst writing skills are challenged through a series of empathetic responses.

    EXTRA-CURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES

    Debate Club is an excellent opportunity for students across year groups to learn how to structure arguments formally and effectively. The focus here is building confidence alongside improving speaking and listening skills in a fun and friendly environment. There are a variety of clubs which are run in the LRC which tie into our subject. Most notably, the Quillich Club meets on a Tuesday lunchtime in which students set and take part in literary quizzes and creative writing activities.

    USEFUL WEBSITES

    https://www.nate.org.uk/cmsfiles/ict/English_home_list.pdf

    IMPORTANT INFORMATION

    Key Stage Three lays the ground work for a successful GCSE course. The skills we focus on are central to achieving in this key subject and we are determined for students to begin Key Stage 4 on the correct learning pathway to achieve at least their targeted grade at GCSE level.

    PROVISION FOR MOST ABLE

    There are extension opportunities planned into each differentiated scheme of learning to ensure students are appropriately challenged and stretched within the Key Stage Three curriculum.

    ASSESSMENT

    Students are assessed in a formative manner at least once a term and given the opportunity to make improvements to their work in ‘DIRT’ (Designated Improvement and Reflection Time) sessions in lessons. Students are also assessed in a summative manner once a term. The move away from National Curriculum Levels has meant that we are able to tailor the Key Stage Three assessment opportunities against the skills required to access and succeed within the GCSE framework. Skills are matched against the different schemes of learning. Students know which areas they are being assessed against termly. Furthermore, students chart their progress in the tracker sheets stuck into each exercise book. Termly small group intervention with an English teacher is put in place for students who are behind target in key skill areas to enable them to make rapid and sustained progress.

  • YEAR 9

    COURSE TITLE

    GCSE English Language and English Literature

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    The new GCSE curriculum offers students fantastic learning opportunities, built around extensive study of classic and modern literature, creative writing and reading and exploring all genres and forms of texts. Students develop on their KS3 skills in year 9, by nurturing analytical insight when exploring writers’ crafts, developing arguments and points of view and tighter and more controlled technical accuracy in their own work.

    The courses are assessed by examinations at the end of year 11 and all students will sit the same examinations:

    Language (AQA spec 8700) – 2 papers each worth 50%, each including reading and writing elements.

    Literature (AQA Spec 8702) – 2 papers each worth 50%, covering Shakespeare, modern literature, poetry and pre 1900 prose (mostly pre-seen other than 2 smaller unseen poetry questions). All literature questions are closed book (not permitted in the exam hall) however students are given an extract (or poem) on which the question is based).

    COURSE CONTENT

    The order of the units studied over the 3 years may be subject to change on a yearly basis.

    Terms 1-2 (9 weeks study)
    Literature: Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing or Macbeth Students will learn about Renaissance England, the text’s plot, characters and themes; they will also build confidence in exploring the language and understand how to approach an exam style question (extract based).

    Terms 2-3 (9 weeks study)
    Language: Exam Paper 1 Reading section – students will explore the 4 components of the reading section, developing understanding of how to approach unseen texts (extract based. They will analyse the effects of language and structure as well as evaluate the text using their own opinions.
    Language: Exam Paper 1 Writing section – students will continue to develop their ability to write descriptively and accurately, using relevant, sophisticated and imaginative vocabulary, imagery and structural features, to respond to a visual stimulus or prompt idea.

    Terms 4-5
    Literature: Poetry – the poetry component of the examination is divided in to two sections – the study and analysis of a pre-seen anthology (provided by exam board – although not permitted in the exam hall – 1 poem will be printed in the paper) and the ability to respond analytically to an unseen poem. Skills nurtured are analysis, evaluation of a writer’s crafts and effect on the reader, understanding of poetic techniques (including terminology) and comparison.

    Term 6
    Literature: Modern Drama or Prose – Students will have an opportunity to study a modern British text (for example An Inspector Calls or Animal Farm). Like the Shakespeare component, students will understand plot, character, themes and writer’s intentions and be able to analyse meanings in language and structure. This will continue in to year 10 term 1, at the end of which they will be ready to practise an exam style (extract based) question.

    EXTRA-CURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES

    The LRC is open every lunch time with a range of activities run by Mrs Plowman our LRC manager.
    Students will continue on the Accelerated Reader programme in to year 9, with opportunities to win prizes for improvements made to their reading ages, most words read and correct answers in their quizzes.
    We also run a debate club, ranging from year 7 up through to the sixth form. Currently this is held on Tuesday lunchtimes, run by Miss Windridge.

    USEFUL WEBSITES AND RESOURCE

    http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/gcse The Language and Literature specifications can be found here (specification numbers can be found above).
    BBC Bitesize offers summaries and quizzes on the literature texts as well as advice on how to approach the Language papers.
    No Fear Shakespeare http://nfs.sparknotes.com/ provides text summaries, character details and the whole original text, with a translated version to the right.
    http://www.poemhunter.com/ lists many famous poems, information on poets and may also have some useful reader comments attached to help understanding (not all to be taken seriously perhaps!)
    http://literary-devices.com/ lists all the possible terminology you could want, with helpful definitions, in studying poems, prose, plays and non-fiction texts.
    Youtube houses videos / films of poems being read, plays being performed and also analysis of some texts by teachers, academics and other students.
    Reviews of texts in national / global newspapers such as The Guardian and The New York Times can help with understanding of themes, plot and characters.
    Please note, film versions can be useful to watch to support understanding of a text, but cannot take the place of reading the text itself.

    IMPORTANT INFORMATION
    We have taken the decision to use year 9 as a launch pad for much of the Literature course, as we will have repeated opportunities to revisit and review learning, over the three years and therefore have more time to prepare the students in studying the depth and breadth of texts required.
    The new curriculum requires all students to be confident readers and therefore it is really important that students are getting a good reading diet at home. Even if they are not strong or confident with reading – or even that they just do not enjoy it – it is vital to their English GCSE qualifications. Homework will expose students to a wide range of text types, from all genres and eras, however the more additional support you can provide at home with reading challenging texts, the more confident students will feel.
    We strongly recommend that students get their own copies of their three required Literature texts (these will be advised in year 9 by class teachers; Shakespeare will be confirmed at the end of year 8). They can then annotate in their own copies. Our advice would be to get versions with glossaries / translations in and can be found second hand on sites such as Amazon or eBay (some second hand copies might even have some notes from a previous owner in). York notes study guides are also useful.

    PROVISION FOR MOST ABLE

    Differentiated lessons to challenge and push more able students and work towards the highest possible level.
    Assisting other students and acting as mentor/role model
    Participation in the School Talented and Gifted programme.

    Students can photocopy their own extracts / poems to annotate and analyse. The format for the questions is always the same so they could devise their own, extra to what we set.

    ASSESSMENT

    Termly or end of unit assessments (exam style question or paper).
    Shakespeare PPE in the hall in November.
    Poetry PPE in the hall in term 5.
    Ongoing assessment and targets for literacy.
    Frequent, dedicated marked work with helpful and supportive feedback is at the heart of what we do.

  • YEAR 10

    COURSE TITLE

    GCSE English Language and English Literature

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    The new GCSE curriculum offers students fantastic learning opportunities, built around extensive study of classic and modern literature, creative writing and reading and exploring all genres and forms of texts. Students develop analytical insight when exploring writers’ crafts, developing arguments and points of view and tighter and more controlled technical accuracy in their own work.
    The courses are assessed by examinations at the end of Year 11 and all students will sit the same examinations:
    Language (AQA spec 8700) – 2 papers each worth 50%, each including reading and writing elements.
    Literature (AQA Spec 8702) – 2 papers each worth 50%, covering Shakespeare, modern literature, poetry and pre 1900 prose (mostly pre-seen other than 2 smaller unseen poetry questions). All literature questions are closed book (not permitted in the exam hall) however students are given an extract (or poem) on which the question is based).
    Speaking and Listening – students will receive a certificate along with their results in August which confirms that they have completed a speaking and listening task. This will be a presentation to class (or a smaller group) and their teacher on a subject of their choice, with an opportunity for questions at the end. It is advised that students looking to receive a Merit or Distinction should choose a topic that is challenging and persuasive, rather than simply descriptive and explanatory. This will be completed in the early part of Year 11, with some homeworks set in order to research and prepare their topic. This will also be an opportunity to practise for Language Paper 2 Writing section as students will be expected to develop a point of view and structure their text in a clear and interesting way.

    COURSE CONTENT

    The order of the units studied over the year may be subject to change on a annual basis. Most classes will have 2 teachers – below outlines what students will study with each of their teachers, each term.
    At all times, students will continue to work on their technical accuracy and control of spelling, punctuation and grammar, and will be given literacy targets to ensure that they make suitable and sustained progress in these areas.
    Terms 1-2
    Teacher 1 Literature: Completion of the 19th Century Novel - Students will study a 19th Century text, evaluating meanings in language, setting, form and structure. They will be completing some timed responses in order to show understanding of the text – this is an extract based task. They will need to bring in their understanding of the context surrounding the setting of the text and perspective of the writer. They will also need to learn quotations from across the text so that they can refer to elsewhere in the play and not just the extract provided.
    Teacher 2 Language: Paper 2 Reading and Writing – students will explore the 4 components of the reading section, ensuring they can analyse non-fiction and literary non-fiction texts. They will respond in both short and extended answers, developing comparative and analytical skills as well as showing understanding of a writer’s attitude. In their written work, students will continue to develop skills in writing to persuade, advise, argue and inform, considering how they can structure a text to develop a point of view and attitude.
    Term 3-4
    Teacher 1 Language: Exam Paper 1 Writing section – students will continue to develop their ability to write descriptively and accurately, using relevant, sophisticated and imaginative vocabulary, imagery and structural features, to respond to a visual stimulus or prompt idea.
    Teacher 1 Literature: Unseen Poetry - students will return to the poetry component of the examination, this time focusing heavily on the unseen aspect. We will review poems from the anthology within this term as well. By this stage, students should be able to apply their understanding of poetic devices and structures to explore a range of poems. Their comparative skills should also begin to consolidate.
    Teacher 2 Literature: Modern Drama or Prose – Students will have an opportunity to study a modern British text (for example An Inspector Calls or Animal Farm). Like the Shakespeare component, students will understand plot, character, themes and writer’s intentions and be able to analyse meanings in language and structure. At the end of this term, they will be ready to practise an exam style (extract based) question.
    Terms 5-6
    Teacher 1 Language: Exam Paper 1 Reading section – students will explore the 4 components of the reading section, developing understanding of how to approach unseen texts (extract based. They will analyse the effects of language and structure as well as evaluate the text using their own opinions.
    Teacher 1 Speaking and Listening – students will begin to prepare and complete their presentations on a topic of their choice. These should be topics they are interested in but of a challenging and interesting nature, which will spark questions from the audience. They will be assessed on their ability to communicate clearly, with purpose, and how they use language and structure to engage their audience. Their tone of voice, body language and eye contact will also be assessed. Students may be recorded for moderation purposes.

    Teacher 2 Literature: Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing or Macbeth Students will revise what they have already studied in year 9 and ensure they are able to respond to an extract from the play. They will need to bring in their understanding of Renaissance England, the text’s plot, characters and themes. They will need to learn quotations from across the text so that they can refer to elsewhere in the play and not just the extract provided.

    EXTRA-CURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES

    The LRC is open every lunch time with a range of activities run by Mrs Plowman our LRC manager.

    We also run a debate club, ranging from year 7 up through to the sixth form. Currently this is held on Tuesday lunchtimes, run by Miss Windridge.

    USEFUL WEBSITES AND RESOURCES

    The Language and Literature specifications can be found here (specification numbers can be found above).

    BBC Bitesize offers summaries and quizzes on the literature texts as well as advice on how to approach the Language papers.

    No Fear Shakespeare provides text summaries, character details and the whole original text, with a translated version to the right.

    Poem Hunter lists many famous poems, information on poets and may also have some useful reader comments attached to help understanding (not all to be taken seriously perhaps!)

    Literary Devices lists all the possible terminology you could want, with helpful definitions, in studying poems, prose, plays and non-fiction texts.
    Youtube houses videos / films of poems being read, plays being performed and also analysis of some texts by teachers, academics and other students.
    Reviews of texts in national / global newspapers such as The Guardian and The New York Times can help with understanding of themes, plot and characters.
    Please note, film versions can be useful to watch to support understanding of a text, but cannot take the place of reading the text itself.

    IMPORTANT INFORMATION

    The new curriculum requires all students to be confident readers and therefore it is really important that students are getting a good reading diet at home. Even if they are not strong or confident with reading – or even that they just do not enjoy it – it is vital to their English GCSE qualifications. Homeworks will expose students to a wide range of text types, from all genres and eras, however the more additional support you can provide at home with reading challenging texts, the more confident students will feel.

    We strongly recommend that students get their own copies of their three required Literature texts (these will be advised in Year 9 by class teachers; Shakespeare will be confirmed at the end of Year 8). They can then annotate in their own copies. Our advice would be to get versions with glossaries / translations in and can be found second hand on sites such as Amazon or ebay (some second hand copies might even have some notes from a previous owner in). York notes study guides are also useful.

    PROVISION FOR MOST ABLE

    • Differentiated lessons to challenge and push more able students and work towards the highest possible level.
    • Assisting other students and acting as mentor/role model
    • Participation in the School Talented and Gifted programme.
    • Students can photocopy their own extracts / poems to annotate and analyse. The format for the questions is always the same so they could devise their own, extra to what we set.

    ASSESSMENT

    Termly or end of unit assessments (exam style question or paper).
    Students are expected to apply feedback from one piece of work and apply to the next.
    Students will not necessarily be assessed on the unit they are currently studying in class. The intention here is to ensure that students are revising each of the texts and components throughout the year.
    Frequent, dedicated marked work with helpful and supportive feedback is at the heart of what we do.

  • YEAR 11

    COURSE TITLE

    GCSE English Language and English Literature

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    The new GCSE curriculum offers students fantastic learning opportunities, built around extensive study of classic and modern literature, creative writing and reading and exploring all genres and forms of texts. Students develop analytical insight when exploring writers’ crafts, developing arguments and points of view and tighter and more controlled technical accuracy in their own work.
    The courses are assessed by examinations at the end of Year 11 and all students will sit the same examinations:
    Language (AQA spec 8700) – 2 papers each worth 50%, each including reading and writing elements.
    Literature (AQA Spec 8702) – 2 papers each worth 50%, covering Shakespeare, modern literature, poetry and pre 1900 prose (mostly pre-seen other than 2 smaller unseen poetry questions). All literature questions are closed book (not permitted in the exam hall) however students are given an extract (or poem) on which the question is based).
    Speaking and Listening – students will receive a certificate along with their results in August which confirms that they have completed a speaking and listening task. This will be a presentation to class (or a smaller group) and their teacher on a subject of their choice, with an opportunity for questions at the end. It is advised that students looking to receive a Merit or Distinction should choose a topic that is challenging and persuasive, rather than simply descriptive and explanatory. This will be completed in the early part of year 11, with some homeworks set in order to research and prepare their topic. This will also be an opportunity to practise for Language Paper 2 Writing section as students will be expected to develop a point of view and structure their text in a clear and interesting way.

    COURSE CONTENT

    The order of the units studied over the may be subject to change on a yearly basis. Most classes will have 2 teachers – below outlines what students will study with each of their teachers, each term.
    At all times, students will continue to work on their technical accuracy and control of spelling, punctuation and grammar, and will be given literacy targets to ensure that they make suitable and sustained progress in these areas.

    Term 1 (3week study with both teachers)
    Literature: Completion of the 19th Century Novel Students will bring their study of their 19th Century text to a close, completing some timed responses in order to show understanding of language, structure, themes and characters. They will need to bring in their understanding of the context surrounding the setting of the text and perspective of the writer. They will also need to learn quotations from across the text so that they can refer to elsewhere in the play and not just the extract provided.

    Term 1 (4week study)
    Teacher 1 Language: Exam Paper 1 Reading section – students will explore the 4 components of the reading section, developing understanding of how to approach unseen texts (extract based). They will analyse the effects of language and structure as well as evaluate the text using their own opinions.
    Teacher 2 Language: Exam Paper 1 Writing section – students will continue to develop their ability to write descriptively and accurately, using relevant, sophisticated and imaginative vocabulary, imagery and structural features, to respond to a visual stimulus or prompt idea.

    Term 2
    Teacher 1 Language: Exam Paper 2 Reading Section – students will explore the 4 components of the reading section, ensuring they can analyse non-fiction and literary non-fiction texts. They will respond in both short and extended answers, developing comparative and analytical skills as well as showing understanding of a writer’s attitude.
    Teacher 2 Language: Exam Paper 2 Writing Section – students will continue to develop skills in writing to persuade, advise, argue and inform, considering how they can structure a text to develop a point of view and attitude.

    Term 3
    Both teachers Literature: Poetry – the poetry component of the examination is divided in to two sections: the study and analysis of a pre-seen anthology (provided by exam board – although not permitted in the exam hall – 1 poem will be printed in the paper) and the ability to respond analytically to an unseen poem. Skills nurtured are analysis, evaluation of a writer’s crafts and effect on the reader, understanding of poetic techniques (including terminology) and comparison. Students will study the anthology with one teacher and unseen components with the other.

    Term 4
    Teacher 1 Literature: Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing or Macbeth Students will revise what they have already studied in year 10 and ensure they are able to respond to an extract from the play. They will need to bring in their understanding of Renaissance England, the text’s plot, characters and themes. They will need to learn quotations from across the text so that they can refer to elsewhere in the play and not just the extract provided.
    Teacher 2 Literature: Modern Drama or Prose – Students will revise what they have already studied in year 10 and ensure they are able to respond to an extract from the text. Like the Shakespeare component, students will understand plot, character, themes and writer’s intentions and be able to analyse meanings in language and structure. Students will need to show understanding of the writer’s viewpoints and again, like the Shakespeare component, will need to know quotations from across the text.

    Term 5
    Teacher 1 Language: Reading paper skills – students will review their reading skills for both papers 1 & 2. This will draw together all of the analytical and comparative skills they have developed across the year and be an opportunity to refine their examination approach.
    Teacher 2 Literature: 19th Century Revision – students will have a final opportunity to revise their 19th Century text, ensuring they have learned quotations and can explore how themes and characters develop and change across the text.

    EXTRA-CURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES

    The LRC is open every lunch time with a range of activities run by Mrs Plowman our LRC manager.
    We also run a debate club, ranging from year 7 up through to the sixth form. Currently this is held on Tuesday lunchtimes, run by Miss Windridge.

    USEFUL WEBSITES AND RESOURCES

    http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/gcse The Language and Literature specifications can be found here (specification numbers can be found above).
    BBC Bitesize offers summaries and quizzes on the literature texts as well as advice on how to approach the Language papers.
    No Fear Shakespeare http://nfs.sparknotes.com/ provides text summaries, character details and the whole original text, with a translated version to the right.
    http://www.poemhunter.com/ lists many famous poems, information on poets and may also have some useful reader comments attached to help understanding (not all to be taken seriously perhaps!)
    http://literary-devices.com/ lists all the possible terminology you could want, with helpful definitions, in studying poems, prose, plays and non-fiction texts.
    YouTube houses videos / films of poems being read, plays being performed and also analysis of some texts by teachers, academics and other students.
    Reviews of texts in national / global newspapers such as The Guardian and The New York Times can help with understanding of themes, plot and characters.

    Please note, film versions can be useful to watch to support understanding of a text, but cannot take the place of reading the text itself.

    IMPORTANT INFORMATION

    The new curriculum requires all students to be confident readers and therefore it is really important that students are getting a good reading diet at home. Even if they are not strong or confident with reading – or even that they just do not enjoy it – it is vital to their English GCSE qualifications. Homeworks will expose students to a wide range of text types, from all genres and eras, however the more additional support you can provide at home with reading challenging texts, the more confident students will feel.
    If they haven’t already purchased them, we strongly recommend that students get their own copies of their three required Literature texts. They can then annotate in their own copies. Our advice would be to get versions with glossaries / translations in and can be found second hand on sites such as Amazon or ebay (some second hand copies might even have some notes from a previous owner in). York Notes study guides are also useful.

    PROVISION FOR MOST ABLE

    Differentiated lessons to challenge and push more able students and work towards the highest possible level.
    Assisting other students and acting as mentor/role model
    Participation in the School Talented and Gifted programme.

    Students can photocopy their own extracts / poems to annotate and analyse. The format for the questions is always the same so they could devise their own, extra to what we set.

    ASSESSMENT

    Termly or end of unit assessments (exam style question or paper).
    Students are expected to apply feedback from one piece of work and apply to the next.
    Students will not necessarily be assessed on the unit they are currently studying in class. The intention here is to ensure that students are revising each of the texts and components throughout the year.
    Frequent, dedicated marked work with helpful and supportive feedback is at the heart of what we do.

  • YEAR 12

    COURSE TITLE

    GCSE English Language and English Literature

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    The new GCSE curriculum offers students fantastic learning opportunities, built around extensive study of classic and modern literature, creative writing and reading and exploring all genres and forms of texts. Students develop analytical insight when exploring writers’ crafts, developing arguments and points of view and tighter and more controlled technical accuracy in their own work.
    The courses are assessed by examinations at the end of Year 11 and all students will sit the same examinations:
    Language (AQA spec 8700) – 2 papers each worth 50%, each including reading and writing elements.
    Literature (AQA Spec 8702) – 2 papers each worth 50%, covering Shakespeare, modern literature, poetry and pre 1900 prose (mostly pre-seen other than 2 smaller unseen poetry questions). All literature questions are closed book (not permitted in the exam hall) however students are given an extract (or poem) on which the question is based).
    Speaking and Listening – students will receive a certificate along with their results in August which confirms that they have completed a speaking and listening task. This will be a presentation to class (or a smaller group) and their teacher on a subject of their choice, with an opportunity for questions at the end. It is advised that students looking to receive a Merit or Distinction should choose a topic that is challenging and persuasive, rather than simply descriptive and explanatory. This will be completed in the early part of year 11, with some homeworks set in order to research and prepare their topic. This will also be an opportunity to practise for Language Paper 2 Writing section as students will be expected to develop a point of view and structure their text in a clear and interesting way.

    COURSE CONTENT

    The order of the units studied over the may be subject to change on a yearly basis. Most classes will have 2 teachers – below outlines what students will study with each of their teachers, each term.
    At all times, students will continue to work on their technical accuracy and control of spelling, punctuation and grammar, and will be given literacy targets to ensure that they make suitable and sustained progress in these areas.

    Term 1 (3week study with both teachers)
    Literature: Completion of the 19th Century Novel Students will bring their study of their 19th Century text to a close, completing some timed responses in order to show understanding of language, structure, themes and characters. They will need to bring in their understanding of the context surrounding the setting of the text and perspective of the writer. They will also need to learn quotations from across the text so that they can refer to elsewhere in the play and not just the extract provided.

    Term 1 (4week study)
    Teacher 1 Language: Exam Paper 1 Reading section – students will explore the 4 components of the reading section, developing understanding of how to approach unseen texts (extract based). They will analyse the effects of language and structure as well as evaluate the text using their own opinions.
    Teacher 2 Language: Exam Paper 1 Writing section – students will continue to develop their ability to write descriptively and accurately, using relevant, sophisticated and imaginative vocabulary, imagery and structural features, to respond to a visual stimulus or prompt idea.

    Term 2
    Teacher 1 Language: Exam Paper 2 Reading Section – students will explore the 4 components of the reading section, ensuring they can analyse non-fiction and literary non-fiction texts. They will respond in both short and extended answers, developing comparative and analytical skills as well as showing understanding of a writer’s attitude.
    Teacher 2 Language: Exam Paper 2 Writing Section – students will continue to develop skills in writing to persuade, advise, argue and inform, considering how they can structure a text to develop a point of view and attitude.

    Term 3
    Both teachers Literature: Poetry – the poetry component of the examination is divided in to two sections: the study and analysis of a pre-seen anthology (provided by exam board – although not permitted in the exam hall – 1 poem will be printed in the paper) and the ability to respond analytically to an unseen poem. Skills nurtured are analysis, evaluation of a writer’s crafts and effect on the reader, understanding of poetic techniques (including terminology) and comparison. Students will study the anthology with one teacher and unseen components with the other.

    Term 4
    Teacher 1 Literature: Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing or Macbeth Students will revise what they have already studied in year 10 and ensure they are able to respond to an extract from the play. They will need to bring in their understanding of Renaissance England, the text’s plot, characters and themes. They will need to learn quotations from across the text so that they can refer to elsewhere in the play and not just the extract provided.
    Teacher 2 Literature: Modern Drama or Prose – Students will revise what they have already studied in year 10 and ensure they are able to respond to an extract from the text. Like the Shakespeare component, students will understand plot, character, themes and writer’s intentions and be able to analyse meanings in language and structure. Students will need to show understanding of the writer’s viewpoints and again, like the Shakespeare component, will need to know quotations from across the text.

    Term 5
    Teacher 1 Language: Reading paper skills – students will review their reading skills for both papers 1 & 2. This will draw together all of the analytical and comparative skills they have developed across the year and be an opportunity to refine their examination approach.
    Teacher 2 Literature: 19th Century Revision – students will have a final opportunity to revise their 19th Century text, ensuring they have learned quotations and can explore how themes and characters develop and change across the text.

    EXTRA-CURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES

    The LRC is open every lunch time with a range of activities run by Mrs Plowman our LRC manager.
    We also run a debate club, ranging from year 7 up through to the sixth form. Currently this is held on Tuesday lunchtimes, run by Miss Windridge.

    USEFUL WEBSITES AND RESOURCES

    http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/gcse The Language and Literature specifications can be found here (specification numbers can be found above).
    BBC Bitesize offers summaries and quizzes on the literature texts as well as advice on how to approach the Language papers.
    No Fear Shakespeare http://nfs.sparknotes.com/ provides text summaries, character details and the whole original text, with a translated version to the right.
    http://www.poemhunter.com/ lists many famous poems, information on poets and may also have some useful reader comments attached to help understanding (not all to be taken seriously perhaps!)
    http://literary-devices.com/ lists all the possible terminology you could want, with helpful definitions, in studying poems, prose, plays and non-fiction texts.
    YouTube houses videos / films of poems being read, plays being performed and also analysis of some texts by teachers, academics and other students.
    Reviews of texts in national / global newspapers such as The Guardian and The New York Times can help with understanding of themes, plot and characters.

    Please note, film versions can be useful to watch to support understanding of a text, but cannot take the place of reading the text itself.

    IMPORTANT INFORMATION

    The new curriculum requires all students to be confident readers and therefore it is really important that students are getting a good reading diet at home. Even if they are not strong or confident with reading – or even that they just do not enjoy it – it is vital to their English GCSE qualifications. Homeworks will expose students to a wide range of text types, from all genres and eras, however the more additional support you can provide at home with reading challenging texts, the more confident students will feel.
    If they haven’t already purchased them, we strongly recommend that students get their own copies of their three required Literature texts. They can then annotate in their own copies. Our advice would be to get versions with glossaries / translations in and can be found second hand on sites such as Amazon or ebay (some second hand copies might even have some notes from a previous owner in). York Notes study guides are also useful.

    PROVISION FOR MOST ABLE

    Differentiated lessons to challenge and push more able students and work towards the highest possible level.
    Assisting other students and acting as mentor/role model
    Participation in the School Talented and Gifted programme.

    Students can photocopy their own extracts / poems to annotate and analyse. The format for the questions is always the same so they could devise their own, extra to what we set.

    ASSESSMENT

    Termly or end of unit assessments (exam style question or paper).
    Students are expected to apply feedback from one piece of work and apply to the next.
    Students will not necessarily be assessed on the unit they are currently studying in class. The intention here is to ensure that students are revising each of the texts and components throughout the year.
    Frequent, dedicated marked work with helpful and supportive feedback is at the heart of what we do.

  • YEAR 13

    COURSE TITLE

    GCSE English Language and English Literature

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    The new GCSE curriculum offers students fantastic learning opportunities, built around extensive study of classic and modern literature, creative writing and reading and exploring all genres and forms of texts. Students develop analytical insight when exploring writers’ crafts, developing arguments and points of view and tighter and more controlled technical accuracy in their own work.
    The courses are assessed by examinations at the end of Year 11 and all students will sit the same examinations:
    Language (AQA spec 8700) – 2 papers each worth 50%, each including reading and writing elements.
    Literature (AQA Spec 8702) – 2 papers each worth 50%, covering Shakespeare, modern literature, poetry and pre 1900 prose (mostly pre-seen other than 2 smaller unseen poetry questions). All literature questions are closed book (not permitted in the exam hall) however students are given an extract (or poem) on which the question is based).
    Speaking and Listening – students will receive a certificate along with their results in August which confirms that they have completed a speaking and listening task. This will be a presentation to class (or a smaller group) and their teacher on a subject of their choice, with an opportunity for questions at the end. It is advised that students looking to receive a Merit or Distinction should choose a topic that is challenging and persuasive, rather than simply descriptive and explanatory. This will be completed in the early part of year 11, with some homeworks set in order to research and prepare their topic. This will also be an opportunity to practise for Language Paper 2 Writing section as students will be expected to develop a point of view and structure their text in a clear and interesting way.

    COURSE CONTENT

    The order of the units studied over the may be subject to change on a yearly basis. Most classes will have 2 teachers – below outlines what students will study with each of their teachers, each term.
    At all times, students will continue to work on their technical accuracy and control of spelling, punctuation and grammar, and will be given literacy targets to ensure that they make suitable and sustained progress in these areas.

    Term 1 (3week study with both teachers)
    Literature: Completion of the 19th Century Novel Students will bring their study of their 19th Century text to a close, completing some timed responses in order to show understanding of language, structure, themes and characters. They will need to bring in their understanding of the context surrounding the setting of the text and perspective of the writer. They will also need to learn quotations from across the text so that they can refer to elsewhere in the play and not just the extract provided.

    Term 1 (4week study)
    Teacher 1 Language: Exam Paper 1 Reading section – students will explore the 4 components of the reading section, developing understanding of how to approach unseen texts (extract based). They will analyse the effects of language and structure as well as evaluate the text using their own opinions.
    Teacher 2 Language: Exam Paper 1 Writing section – students will continue to develop their ability to write descriptively and accurately, using relevant, sophisticated and imaginative vocabulary, imagery and structural features, to respond to a visual stimulus or prompt idea.

    Term 2
    Teacher 1 Language: Exam Paper 2 Reading Section – students will explore the 4 components of the reading section, ensuring they can analyse non-fiction and literary non-fiction texts. They will respond in both short and extended answers, developing comparative and analytical skills as well as showing understanding of a writer’s attitude.
    Teacher 2 Language: Exam Paper 2 Writing Section – students will continue to develop skills in writing to persuade, advise, argue and inform, considering how they can structure a text to develop a point of view and attitude.

    Term 3
    Both teachers Literature: Poetry – the poetry component of the examination is divided in to two sections: the study and analysis of a pre-seen anthology (provided by exam board – although not permitted in the exam hall – 1 poem will be printed in the paper) and the ability to respond analytically to an unseen poem. Skills nurtured are analysis, evaluation of a writer’s crafts and effect on the reader, understanding of poetic techniques (including terminology) and comparison. Students will study the anthology with one teacher and unseen components with the other.

    Term 4
    Teacher 1 Literature: Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing or Macbeth Students will revise what they have already studied in year 10 and ensure they are able to respond to an extract from the play. They will need to bring in their understanding of Renaissance England, the text’s plot, characters and themes. They will need to learn quotations from across the text so that they can refer to elsewhere in the play and not just the extract provided.
    Teacher 2 Literature: Modern Drama or Prose – Students will revise what they have already studied in year 10 and ensure they are able to respond to an extract from the text. Like the Shakespeare component, students will understand plot, character, themes and writer’s intentions and be able to analyse meanings in language and structure. Students will need to show understanding of the writer’s viewpoints and again, like the Shakespeare component, will need to know quotations from across the text.

    Term 5
    Teacher 1 Language: Reading paper skills – students will review their reading skills for both papers 1 & 2. This will draw together all of the analytical and comparative skills they have developed across the year and be an opportunity to refine their examination approach.
    Teacher 2 Literature: 19th Century Revision – students will have a final opportunity to revise their 19th Century text, ensuring they have learned quotations and can explore how themes and characters develop and change across the text.

    EXTRA-CURRICULAR OPPORTUNITIES

    The LRC is open every lunch time with a range of activities run by Mrs Plowman our LRC manager.
    We also run a debate club, ranging from year 7 up through to the sixth form. Currently this is held on Tuesday lunchtimes, run by Miss Windridge.

    USEFUL WEBSITES AND RESOURCES

    http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/gcse The Language and Literature specifications can be found here (specification numbers can be found above).
    BBC Bitesize offers summaries and quizzes on the literature texts as well as advice on how to approach the Language papers.
    No Fear Shakespeare http://nfs.sparknotes.com/ provides text summaries, character details and the whole original text, with a translated version to the right.
    http://www.poemhunter.com/ lists many famous poems, information on poets and may also have some useful reader comments attached to help understanding (not all to be taken seriously perhaps!)
    http://literary-devices.com/ lists all the possible terminology you could want, with helpful definitions, in studying poems, prose, plays and non-fiction texts.
    YouTube houses videos / films of poems being read, plays being performed and also analysis of some texts by teachers, academics and other students.
    Reviews of texts in national / global newspapers such as The Guardian and The New York Times can help with understanding of themes, plot and characters.

    Please note, film versions can be useful to watch to support understanding of a text, but cannot take the place of reading the text itself.

    IMPORTANT INFORMATION

    The new curriculum requires all students to be confident readers and therefore it is really important that students are getting a good reading diet at home. Even if they are not strong or confident with reading – or even that they just do not enjoy it – it is vital to their English GCSE qualifications. Homeworks will expose students to a wide range of text types, from all genres and eras, however the more additional support you can provide at home with reading challenging texts, the more confident students will feel.
    If they haven’t already purchased them, we strongly recommend that students get their own copies of their three required Literature texts. They can then annotate in their own copies. Our advice would be to get versions with glossaries / translations in and can be found second hand on sites such as Amazon or ebay (some second hand copies might even have some notes from a previous owner in). York Notes study guides are also useful.

    PROVISION FOR MOST ABLE

    Differentiated lessons to challenge and push more able students and work towards the highest possible level.
    Assisting other students and acting as mentor/role model
    Participation in the School Talented and Gifted programme.

    Students can photocopy their own extracts / poems to annotate and analyse. The format for the questions is always the same so they could devise their own, extra to what we set.

    ASSESSMENT

    Termly or end of unit assessments (exam style question or paper).
    Students are expected to apply feedback from one piece of work and apply to the next.
    Students will not necessarily be assessed on the unit they are currently studying in class. The intention here is to ensure that students are revising each of the texts and components throughout the year.
    Frequent, dedicated marked work with helpful and supportive feedback is at the heart of what we do.

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